Thing 5: Photo Sharing

Wow, Week 5? How’d that happen?  This week we’ll be focusing on photos, photo sharing sites and fun things to do with photos that will help you promote your library and connect with your community.  Photos are a proven way to up engagement with your patrons and supporters, especially on Facebook!

INTRODUCTION

Photo-sharing websites help you keep your photos organized, give you a place to store backup copies of your photos and let you share your photos with just family and friends, or with the world if you choose. Most photo sharing sites have basic accounts for free, often charging a fee for advanced features and increased storage space.

This week we’re going to focus on Flickr one of the most popular photo-sharing services. With a free Flickr account, you can store up to 200 photos, organize them into sets and add descriptive ‘tags’ to help you find specific photos. And if you like, you can allow other people to leave comments on your photos. I’ve made friends with some wonderful library colleagues around the world, just by sharing photos and sending comments back and forth.

There are other popular photo-sharing sites that have similar features, a few of them are listed below. You can use whichever one you prefer for this week’s activities.

And yep. here’s yet another one of those great videos from from Common Craft with a quick introduction to photo-sharing.

(Link to video on Common Craft)

PHOTOS & LIBRARIES

Photos are a wonderful way to connect with your community. Most people enjoy looking at photos of events that they’ve attended (or missed!), photos of projects that their kids & grandkids have been involved with and photos of their community – past and present. People enjoy sharing their photos too. And with the ubiquity of digital cameras, most people can easily participate in photo projects.

Some ideas for how you can use photos to connect with your community.

Examples of libraries with Flickr badges, slideshows, widgets, etc. integrated into their web sites

Explore these library flickr sets to see what fun you can have with flickr:

Are you already a flickr member? Then share your photos by joining these group photo pools:

NOTE: Photo Permissions If you’re taking photos of people in your library and at events, make sure you know what your library’s policy is about getting permission from the people being photographed. Here’s a blog post about how one major library handles this: Photo Permissions at the Library And be sure to check out the MHLS sample photo release form.

TOOLS TO EXPLORE

All of these products have similar features, each has its pros & cons and some people absolutely love one tool or another. If you already have an account with one of these photo-sharing sites, feel free to use your existing account for your project. If you don’t have an account, we recommend Flickr to get started.

  • FlickrOwned by Yahoo! One of the largest and most popular photo-sharing sites. You can tag your photos, comment on the photos of others, search by tag or user, create (or use) RSS feeds, download images in multiple sizes, create sets (sets are like photo albums), create groups for sharing among colleagues, use geotags (location information), and much, much more.
  • PicasaWeb Part of Google. Another very popular tool for uploading and managing your photos. Public albums are searchable through Google image searching. Also has a very useful and free desktop application called Picasa, for managing the photos on you own computer. Picasa is a great photo manager, regardless of which online sharing site you choose to use.
  • Snapfish – From HP. Free unlimited photo storage with the ability to organize, edit, and add borders, tints and other creative touches. Create calendars, albums and other printed products. Share photo albums with friends and family.
  • Shutterfly – Unlimited free storage. Print photos to pick up at local stores and create printed photo albums. Offers an online community where you can share your work and see projects created by others as well as a blog full of great ideas. Shutterfly Share offers free webpage space and templates for showing and sharing your photos

Flickr Tips, Tutorials & How To’s

LEARNING ACTIVITY

There are two options this week, plus a “More to Explore” section for those who are already really familiar with Flickr or those who just want to explore a bit further. If you need some help, remember to check the tutorials listed above. And leave comments & questions at the bottom of this page!

OPTION A

  1. Take a tour of Flickr. Then explore the amazing array of photos on Flickr. You can explores Places, Historic Photos, Current Events and so much more.
  2. Find an interesting image that you could use to help promote your library. To search for photos that you can legally re-use, use Flickr’s advanced search page and check the box for “Only search within Creative Commons-licensed content”
  3. Use any keyword(s) (books, libraries, community, e-books, coffee shops, customers, movies, events, etc…. ) to find photos with those tags.
  4. Find the URL for the photo and use that to add your image to a post on your Learning Journal. Even though your image will automatically link back to the original image in Flickr, you should give credit to the photographer. Something simple like “photo by janesmith” is sufficient for this exercise.
  5. Your Learning Journal Post for the week:
    • Please label your post “Thing 5 : Photo Sharing”
    • Comment on your experience finding images, using Flickr, how you might use photos in your library, or anything else related to the exercise.

–OR– the more fun option!

OPTION B

  1. Create a Free Accounton Flickr.
    • Flickr is part of Yahoo, so if you have a Yahoo account already, you can login with that. You can also login in with your Google account or your Facebook account.
  2. Then use a digital camera to capture a few pictures of something in your library.
  3. Upload these to your new Flickr account and tag at least one of the images with mhlsbybo. Be sure to mark the photos public.
  4. Find the URL for the photo and use that to add your image to a post on your Learning Journal. Even though your image will automatically link back to the original image in Flickr, you should give credit to the photographer. Something simple like “photo by janesmith” is sufficient for this exercise.
  5. BONUS! Participate in SnapShot NY:  A Day in the Life of a Library  Take a look at the web site for more information.
  6. Your learning journal post for the week:
    • Please label your post “Thing 5 : Photo Sharing”
    • Comment on your experience finding images, using Flickr, how you might use photos in your library, or anything else related to the exercise.

MORE TO EXPLORE: If you’re already really familiar with Flickr and want to try something different or if you just want to explore some more fun tools.

  1. Photo Editing– try your hand at editing a photo using one of these online photo editor.
    • Picnik – The future of Picnik is unknown. Google bought it some time ago, whether the editing features will be incorporated into a new product is unclear. Flickr has used Picnik for ages. Hopefully Flickr will develop some new photo-editing options.
    • Pixlr – A popular replacement for Picnik.
    • PhotoShop Express – a free online photo editor from Adobe.
  2. Photo Fun– Make posters, slide shows, collages and so much more. Lots of interesting ideas here.
  3. More ways to find photos
    • Colr Fields – Pick photos by color
    • flickrCC – Searches for Creative Commons licensed photos on flickr.
  4. Explore Pinterest– the hot new image sharing, social bookmarking, curating obsession.

MORE RESOURCES

1 Response to Thing 5: Photo Sharing

  1. Pingback: Week 5: Photographic! | Learn with MHLS

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