Thing 7: Video

Welcome back from your week of catching up! It’s week 7 and we’re coming down the home stretch now!

INTRODUCTION

Of course you’ve heard of YouTube  and probably watched videos there.  It’s really an amazing source of information and fun. It has videos about all sorts of things. And we do mean “all things” – the good, the bad, AND the ugly!  But did you know that YouTube is one of the top most visited web sites? Just behind Facebook and Google. It’s a place that people turn to for music, how-to tutorials, family videos and yes, lots of silly videos too. Video is a media type that can’t be ignored.

There are many different types of video on the web, including:

  • News video: Most newspaper and television news websites have video to enhance their stories. This type of video consists of traditional news pieces done by professional journalists and by “regular people” off the street.
  • TV Shows: Missed your favorite TV show last night? You can probably catch up the next day by visiting the TV network’s web site. Or go to Hulu where you’ll also find lots of current and past television shows. And there are a growing number of shows created for a web-only audience and released in a web-only format.
  • Screencasting: Ever wanted to show someone how to use the library catalog or use a challenging web tool? One way to do it is by screencasting. Screencasting takes video of your computer’s screen and mouse movements, clicks and all. And can even record your voice as well. This gives you the ability to teach people how to do something via video. Screenr & Screencastomatic are two free tools to create screencasts.
  • Videocasts: There are a growing number of web-based services and tools that let you easily broadcast live video using the webcam attached to your computer. And many smartphones can also broadcast live video. UStream is a live video streaming tool that you could use to stream a meeting to people who can’t be there in person.
  • Video blogging: You’re already familiar with blogs, where you can post your thoughts to your own personal website. Videoblogging is the same idea, except posts are created with a video camera, and then the video is posted to a blog.

VIDEO IN LIBRARIES

What can public libraries do with video? Think about:

  • advocacy
  • advertising
  • interviews with authors
  • patrons sharing stories of the community
  • creative teen programming
  • book trailers
  • a video created from photos taken at an event
  • promos for upcoming events
  • videocasts of live events via streaming
  • instructional screencasts
  • tours of the library and more.

This video, 5 Tips to Video: What to Say & How to Look Good Saying It, is a nice introduction to making video for libraries.

LIBRARY & COMMUNITY EXAMPLES

THINGS TO EXPLORE

There are lots of video services on the web. Take a few minutes and explore a few of these.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

As usual, we have several options for you. You only have to do one, but if you’re excited about video go ahead and do more!

OPTION 1:  Find a video and embed it into your learning journal

  1. Search YouTube or a video that interests you. This could be a hobby, a library related video or anything else you’re interested in!
  2. Embed the video in your learning journal post. With a YouTube video, look for the SHARE button right under the video to find the URL for the video, then paste that URL into your learning journal post.  (More info: Instructions on how to embed video into a Posterous Space)
  3. For your learning journal post
    • Please label your post “Thing 7 : Video”
    • Tell us about your experience with this exercise
    • And how you think videos might be useful in your library.

OPTION 2: Make a video!

  1. Get your digital camera (or borrow one if needed). Does it have a video mode? Yes!
  2. Start recording! Take a video of your cat or your dog. Do a 30-second book review. Interview your colleagues. Take a tour of your library. Anything that interests you.
  3. Transfer the video to your computer. How you do that will depend on your camera and your computer.
  4. Get a YouTube account and upload your video.
  5. Embed the video in your learning journal post. With a YouTube video, look for the SHARE button right under the video to find the URL for the video, then paste that URL into your learning journal post.  (More info: Instructions on how to embed video into a Posterous Space)
  6. For your learning journal post
    • Please label your post “Thing 7 : Video”
    • Tell us about your experience with this exercise
    • And how you think videos might be useful in your library.

OPTION 3: Pick one of these other projects if you’ve already tried recording and uploading videos to YouTube. Or if just want to do something different.

  • Edit a Video: If you have video editing software on your computer, try editing your video. Windows MovieMaker is a free downloadable movie editor for a PC that’s fairly easy to use. You may need to read the help files to get started with your software. Or better yet, do a search to see if there’s a video to help you get started with your editing software!  Do some basic edits, like adding a fade in and fade out to your video. Then save it in a YouTube-friendly format.
  • Make an Animoto video: Create a free 30 second video from photos. Upload the photos, pick music, add text if desired. Let Animoto create the transitions. A fun way to present a montage of activities in your library.
  • Try screencasting with Screenr: Use this free online service to record a short tutorial (called a “screencast”) about your library web site, how to use a database, the catalog or some other tool.
  • Google Search Story Video: A fun tool to make a video story out of Google searches. Check out some samples and try your hand at one yourself! (Here’s mine!)
  • For your learning journal post
    • Please label your post “Thing 7 : Video”
    • Tell us about your experience with this exercise
    • And how you think videos might be useful in your library.

MORE RESOURCES

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